Why Eat Buckwheat regularly?

Some say this is a grain but in reality it is not a true grain. Buckwheat ranks low on the glycemic index.

Do you know buckwheat has more protein than rice, wheat, millet or corn?

Do you know buckwheat is extremely rich in the essential amino acids lysine and arginine, in which major cereal crops are deficient?

Do you know buckwheat contains no gluten? That’s why it is safe for people with gluten allergy or celiac disease.

The amino acid profile gives buckwheat the real power of superfoods!

Buckwheat is a very good source of manganese and a good source of copper, magnesium, dietary fiber, and phosphorus. Buckwheat contains two flavonoids with significant health-promoting actions: rutin and quercitin. The protein in buckwheat is a high quality protein, containing all eight essential amino acids, including lysine.

Why Eat Buckwheat – Benefits of Buckwheat!

why eat buckwheat

Here is a short list of benefits of taking buckwheat:

  • Due to unique profile of buckwheat proteins, it is considered a well known super food to support cholesterol health.
  • It may help in supporting blood sugar health.
  • It may help in preventing obesity.
  • It may support healthy blood sugar levels.
  • It may help with the cardiovascular health

You can get phenomenal benefits if you take buckwheat regularly!

A Grain That's Good for Your Cardiovascular System

Diets that contain buckwheat have been linked to lowered risk of developing high cholesterol and high blood pressure. The Yi people of China consume a diet high in buckwheat (100 grams per day, about 3.5 ounces). When researchers tested blood lipids of 805 Yi Chinese, they found that buckwheat intake was associated with lower total serum cholesterol, lower low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL, the form linked to cardiovascular disease), and a high ratio of HDL (health-promoting cholesterol) to total cholesterol.

Buckwheat's beneficial effects are due in part to its rich supply of flavonoids, particularly rutin. Flavonoids are phytonutrients that protect against disease by extending the action of vitamin C and acting as antioxidants. Buckwheat's lipid-lowering activity is largely due to rutin and other flavonoid compounds. These compounds help maintain blood flow, keep platelets from clotting excessively (platelets are compounds in blood that, when triggered, clump together, thus preventing excessive blood loss, and protect LDL from free radical oxidation into potentially harmful cholesterol oxides. All these actions help to protect against heart disease.

Buckwheat is also a good source of magnesium. This mineral relaxes blood vessels, improving blood flow and nutrient delivery while lowering blood pressure—the perfect combination for a healthy cardiovascular system.

Better Blood Sugar Control and a Lower Risk of Diabetes

Canadian researchers, publishing their findings in the Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry have found new evidence that buckwheat may be helpful in the management of diabetes. In a placebo-controlled study, a single dose of buckwheat seed extract lowered blood glucose levels by 12-19% at 90 and 120 minutes after administration when fed to laboratory animals with chemically-induced diabetes. No glucose reduction was seen in animals given placebo. The component in buckwheat responsible for its blood glucose-lowering effects appears to be chiro-inositol, a compound that has been shown in other animal and human studies to play a significant role in glucose metabolism and cell signaling. While researchers do not yet know precisely how it works, preliminary evidence suggests chiro-inositol makes cells more sensitive to insulin and may even act as an insulin mimic. Results of the Canadian study were so promising that one of the lead investigators, Roman Przbylski, is currently collaborating with Canadian-based Kade Research to develop new buckwheat varieties with much higher amounts of chiro-inositol. Although the animals used in this study had the equivalent of Type 1 diabetes in humans, the researchers are confident that buckwheat will exert similar glucose-lowering effects when given to animals with Type 2 diabetes, which is the next study on their agenda. Type 2 or non-insulin dependent diabetes, which is by far the most common form in humans (90% of diabetes in humans is Type 2), is characterized by an inability of cells to respond properly to insulin.

Buckwheat and other whole grains are also rich sources of magnesium, a mineral that acts as a co-factor for more than 300 enzymes, including enzymes involved in the body's use of glucose and insulin secretion.

The FDA permits foods that contain at least 51% whole grains by weight (and are also low in fat, saturated fat, and cholesterol) to display a health claim stating consumption is linked to lower risk of heart disease and certain cancers. Now, research suggests regular consumption of whole grains also reduces risk of type 2 diabetes. (van Dam RM, Hu FB, Diabetes Care).

In this 8-year trial, involving 41,186 participants of the Black Women's Health Study, research data confirmed inverse associations between magnesium, calcium and major food sources in relation to type 2 diabetes that had already been reported in predominantly white populations.

Risk of type 2 diabetes was 31% lower in black women who frequently ate whole grains compared to those eating the least of these magnesium-rich foods. When the women's dietary intake of magnesium intake was considered by itself, a beneficial, but lesser—19%—reduction in risk of type 2 diabetes was found, indicating that whole grains offer special benefits in promoting healthy blood sugar control. Daily consumption of low-fat dairy foods was also helpful, lowering risk of type 2 diabetes by 13%. Get the benefits of both buckwheat and dairy by enjoying a hearty breakfast of hot buckwheat topped with low-fat milk and a spoonful of maple syrup.

10 Health Benefits You may not Know

1. Best source of high-quality, easily digestible proteins - This makes it an excellent meat substitute. High protein buckwheat flour is being studied for possible use in foods to reduce plasma cholesterol, body fat, and cholesterol gallstones.

2. Fat alternative - Buckwheat starch can also act as a fat alternative in processed foods.

3. Good for Blood Pressure - The high level of rutin is extracted from the leaves for medicine to treat high blood pressure.

4. Non allergenic - Buckwheat hulls are used as pillow stuffing for those allergic to feathers, dust, and pollen.

5. May help Blood Sugar Health - New evidence has found that buckwheat may be helpful in the management of diabetes according to Canadian researchers in the Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry. With a glycemic index of 54, it lowers blood sugars more slowly than rice or wheat products.

6. Great for the digestion - “The properties of buckwheat are: Neutral thermal nature; sweet flavor; cleans and strengthens the intestines and improves appetite. Is effective for treating dysentery and chronic diarrhea.” According to Paul Pitchford in Healing with Whole Foods (1993)

7. Chemical free - Buckwheat grows so quickly that it does not usually require a lot of pesticides or other chemicals to grow well.

8. Remove Retained Water from the Body - Buckwheat is good at drawing out retained water and excess fluid from swollen areas of the body.

9. Buckwheat is a warming food - It is classified by macrobiotics as a yang food. It is great for eating in the cold winter months.

10. Buckwheat contains no gluten and is not a grain - It is therefore great for celiac and those on grain free and gluten sensitive diets.

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References:

  1. http://www.whfoods.com/genpage.php?tname=foodspice&dbid=11
  2. http://www.care2.com/greenliving/10-health-benefits-of-buckwheat.html
  3. http://www.nutrition-and-you.com/buckwheat.html

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